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  • DAHI - Foundry Technology

    The DAHI Foundry Technology program thrust seeks to establish an accessible, manufacturable technology for device-level heterogeneous integration of a wide array of materials and devices (including, for example, multiple electronics and MEMS technologies) with complex silicon-enabled (e.g. CMOS) architectures on a common silicon substrate.  The DAHI Foundry Technology thrust will incorporate and build upon the heterogeneous integration technologies of the COSMOS and E-PHI program thrusts, while also developing new capabilities in heterogeneous integration processes, yield and circuit design innovation.  This program thrust is expected to culminate in accessible foundry processes of DAHI technology and demonstrations of advanced microsystems with innovative architectures and designs that leverage heterogeneous integration.

    The DAHI Foundry Technology program thrust seeks to establish an accessible, manufacturable technology for device-level heterogeneous integration of a wide array of materials and devices (including, for example, multiple electronics and MEMS technologies) with complex silicon-enabled (e.g. CMOS) architectures on a common silicon substrate.  The DAHI Foundry Technology thrust will incorporate and build upon the heterogeneous integration technologies of the COSMOS and E-PHI program thrusts, while also developing new capabilities in heterogeneous integration processes, yield and circuit design innovation.  This program thrust is expected to culminate in accessible foundry processes of DAHI technology and demonstrations of advanced microsystems with innovative architectures and designs that leverage heterogeneous integration.

    By enabling the ability to ‘mix and match’ a wide variety of devices and materials on a common silicon substrate, circuit designers can select the best device for each function within their designs.  This integration would provide DoD systems with the benefits of a variety of devices and materials integrated in close proximity on a single chip, minimizing the performance limitations caused by physical separation among devices.  Approaches are also sought to enable complex signal-processing and self-correction architectures to be brought to bear in such microsystems.

    The DAHI Foundry Technology program thrust broad agency announcement was posted in March, 2012.

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